Tag Archives: best practices

Justin Wayne On The DIY Artist Route

justin-wayne-ill-micIndie radio show host and podcast creator Justin Wayne joined me for a fantastic conversation about music, the indie music revolution, success for indie and DIY musicians and more. He and I share a lot in common including creating music platforms that have grown tremendously over the years. Justin even has an “associate producer” named Puck, who is a cat. I have a similar position filled by my cat named Baby Girl.

I wanted to talk with Justin on the DIY Artist Route podcast because his insights into the growth of indie music from the perspective of a radio host. We both agree that the appeal indie and unsigned artists have to music fans who are searching for something commercial radio refuses to deliver is a powerful one. I talk a lot about how artists can grow their fan base and reach more people by getting on indie radio. Justin reiterates a lot of the things I talk about regularly on this blog, all without any prompt or suggestion. What I mean by that is us radio folks think a lot alike. His attitude and insight into how artists can reach out to radio iterates a lot of what I teach in The Indie Radio Course.

Justin Wayne is a really funny guy and I thoroughly enjoyed talking with him. Among the talking points made are his suggestion for what artists need to do in order to “get discovered” by radio platforms (i.e. get their submissions listened to and considered), the power that indie music has to change all of the music industry (for the better), what a musician’s job really is (far beyond just making music), and how partnering with people who believe in you is how you really gain the growth you want.

Here are just a few of the quotes found in the podcast:
“We get a lot of submissions and we see when we have a BCC email. If you’re not taking the time to at least check out the website for a brief moment to see if your music fits on my station, it’s kinda not worth my time to give it a listen. But it’s pretty easy to pick out the people who are taking the time to connect.”

“Have an experience with a radio platform before you start contacting people.”

“Radio guys love to talk about stuff. It’s nice to have something to talk about. So give us something interesting (when you make your submission). Listeners like it because they can go tell their friends.”

“It’s kinda like computer programming. You start small and figure out if it works and then you go from there. You don’t have to start out by recording a full 12 songs. Do 3 or 4 or 5 and make them really good and focus on that.”

“I would never tell an artist to change their style or what they’re doing if they’re really passionate about it. Because that’s the most important thing in my mind. That should come through.”

“When you’re building your team of your manager or even your friends who are helping you out, make sure they understand your passion and what you’re trying to do because there’s nothing more important. You’re trying to improve people’s lives, that’s really what a musician’s job is.”

“It’s sort of a religion. It’s like ‘Do you believe in Independent Music? Do you believe that it’s good?’ Yeah I do. ‘Have you taken Independent music as your personal savior?’ Ok then you’re in. It’s really like that. There are some people who don’t believe it’s good but that’s because they haven’t experienced it. Once they experience it, they’re like ‘yeah it’s great! Why would I want to listen to the (commercial) radio anymore?’”

This was a fantastic experience of indie music insight with Justin Wayne. Hear his indie music podcast The Justin Wayne Show here. Share this podcast with other musicians, indie music folks and anyone else you think can benefit from our discussion. Let me know what you think of this edition in the comments below.

How To Get A Response From Your Radio Submission

Radio Mic Old FashionedYou’ve sent your music submissions out to radio in the hopes that your music will get picked up and carried on radio stations, music programs and other media. Now what?

The NEXT STEP is something a lot of artists don’t do. Honestly, the next step is the best part of the submission process. It shows you how well you do at making first impressions.

Your submission to radio for airplay look just like every artist and label’s blanket pith.

OR it can be crafted in a way that makes you stand out from every other artist who is trying to get their music heard. When you do craft the submission right, you’re in the gold.

Getting a response from stations and programs happens through submissions and pitches. Most music curators have very little time for phone calls, especially to people we don’t know on a first name basis.

Whether you’re contacting radio for airplay, review or interview this principle is true.

Make it a habit to check your email at least once a day after you start your radio submissions. Here’s why:

When a media professional responds to you, you need to make sure any questions they ask in their reply are answered quickly. If they want more information, the longer you take to write back the more you are flirting with a common human characteristic: forgetfulness.

It’s true, we’re human too and with the influx of media that radio music managers deal with on an hourly basis (let alone daily) is massive. If you take 1-2 weeks to respond to a reply that was sent to you about your submission, it becomes harder to make the connection that you wanted to make, and in turn get the airplay or feature you were hoping for.

You’re in the relationship building business, even if music is at the heart and soul of your offering. The truth is that the better you get at networking and building relationship connections, the greater your audience will be and the more radio/media support you’ll have to back it up.

Get The Help You Need With Better Music Submissions

Do you want to know the first, second, and next steps to take to not only get your music on the radio, but build relationships with radio station managers, radio program hosts, music bloggers, and other media professionals? I’d love to show you the practical and connection-building techniques I’ve used for years to do just that. I have answers to help you do all of this and more here.

Have you sent submissions out to radio and not heard anything back? There could be a reason for that too. Let me help you get your messaging right so you can have the airplay and feature you’re looking for. Click here to connect directly with me.