Tag Archives: teacher

Changing The World Through Music With Bree Noble

bree noble FEM women of substance

Bree Noble

I believe that helping other people in life is the key to being successful. It’s a philosophy shared by Zig Ziglar, Oprah Winfrey, Steve Palfreyman, and the incredible Bree Noble.

Bree is the creator and powerhouse behind Women of Substance Radio, Female Entrepreneur Musician Podcast, a musician and coach for musicians. She’s an inspirational person and a wonderful ally in the quest to help creative entrepreneurs grow.

The DIY Artist Route Podcast continues to showcase remarkable and uncommon people who are making a massive difference in the creative industries. Bree Noble is certainly in the top ranks of world-changers.

Bree Noble On The DIY Artist Route Podcast

There are several reasons I wanted her on The DIY Artist Route Podcast. First, I’ve been following her work for years, going back to when I was running a radio station and seeing her name pop up as an influencer in the music industry. I also first heard her music then and appreciated her sound.

In a culture that places an expectation on most female artists to have to conform to some sort of  objectivity in order to be noticed, Bree joins the fight to combat this messed up ideal. Her work with both her radio station, her podcast, and her coaching helps both women and men combat unhealthy and negative stereotypes that are pervasive in the creative industries, music in particular.

What’s noticeable about Bree Noble from the moment you see her is the love in her smile and facial expressions. My good friend Bird Thomas has that superpower, and so does Amanda Palmer (illustrated in her book The Art Of Asking). To communicate love through your eyes and your smile is something that truly remarkable people who live life as love do. It’s inspiring and it makes a huge difference in the lives of people.

You can tell right away in our conversation that helping people through love is Bree Noble’s mission. If it wasn’t music, it’d be something else where she’s helping people by loving them. That’s inspiring. Let’s follow that example!

Overcoming Obstacles For Creative Entrepreneurs

There are several things that hinder growth and success for artists, musicians, and creatives. Guess what? They’re the same hindrances that investment bankers, world leaders, Olympic athletes and everyone else in the world face: negative mindsets. Doubt is a big challenge we all face as human beings. How do we overcome doubt? We proactively change our mindsets. Bree and I discuss this practice in the podcast.

“Do the thing that scares you the most.” -Bree Noble

How To Create The Change You Want In Your Career

One other big point Bree makes in our conversation, and one I want to highlight here due to my work on The DIY Musician’s Radio Handbook and the Indie Radio Promotion Course is that information doesn’t create change. Actions do. We live in a historical era of bountiful information available in nanoseconds. Similar to the fact that there’s more music produced in a year than we can consume, the same is true for information.

The amount of books, podcasts, online courses, and seminars that teach us how to do everything (25 different ways to do anything) could lead us in circles chasing the next “How To” method. Instead of spending your time learning everything, do the thing you learn.

Choose your teacher, and choose people whose values align with yours. You’re reading this blog, and listening to my podcast. I believe that you’ve seen and heard something I’ve said and my values align with yours. If so, I can be your teacher to help you grow. But the key is always going to be that you do something with what I teach you.

Information by itself will never give you the end goal you want. You have to take action.

You can take action on one specific thing that connected with in the podcast (mentioned at the end). The biggest one is to give LOVE today to someone in your world. Love is what changes everything for the better. Also, connect with Bree Noble on her Facebook page (and see a workshop we did together on 5/24/17) because her mission and her heart is so similar to my own: to love and help other people.

 

Jerzy Jung, The DIY Artist Route And You

JerzyJungAwardJerzy Jung embodies everything you can imagine for a DIY artist. She is a musician, actress, music teacher, and practitioner of the golden rule. Her songwriting is comparable to that of Regina Spektor in how she takes common, everyday elements and pieces them together to tell a much bigger story. Her song Black Dress/White Dress is a prime example of using fashion as a metaphor for how society treats women.

I’ve known Jerzy Jung for several years, first discovering her music in 2009 when I heard her songs on myspace. We ended up doing an interview and have kept in touch since. She’s a regularly featured artist on The Appetizer Radio Show, and was a perfect artist to chat with in the DIY Artist Route podcast series.

Every conversation on the DIY Artist Route podcast has featured some great quotes. Here are just a few of what you can gather from this episode:
“The mindset of ‘pick me pick me and my whole life will change’ hurt me. The student mentality will help you better. Now I’m like ‘what kind I learn and attracting people who may help me’ has been more helpful. I make the best work I can and my focus is there, and on attracting people who can help.”

“This industry we signed into is not easy, it’s mysterious, and it’s not kind. You’re wondering where your road map is and you have this goal and no idea on how to get there.”

“To be a good community member you have to give in the ways that people are asking to give instead of just what you feel like giving.”

Hitrecord is this fantastic online community where artists connect from anywhere in the world. Nothing is too big or too small.”

“I’m concerned with the business side (of music) but I try not to lose that playfulness.”

Lessons from crowdfunding: The fear of doing it is worse than actually starting and doing it.

“Doing the crowdfunder and making the video helped me to clarify why I make art and it felt really good to define it and see it on paper. It was a reminder to myself for why I chose this life.”

“The real test with all this ambiguity and all this disappointment, do you still love it (music) and just have to do it? Even though this life we picked is weird, focusing on gratitude is so important.”

*Note: I did just get the podcast on iTunes, yet there have been intermittent issues with the podcast host site, which is why I included the Podbean player above so you can hear it regardless.

I’m working to get that resolved so that this episode will be included in the iTunes list. Suffice to say, I’m learning from trial and error about podcasting and how it works best. I also am gaining valuable experience on who to use and who to avoid when setting up a podcast. If you have any suggestions or insight into the podcast realm, please share them with me. Thank you!

What Happens When Your Dreams Change Shape

I’ve noticed that our dreams aren’t always permanent things.

They can change.

Dreams changing shape or mutating into new things is good, not something that should make you nervous. I’ve heard people say with alarm, “But I used to want to do this thing with all my heart but I don’t know if I want that anymore.” It’s ok for your dreams to change if you are changing too. And it’s also worth noting why your dreams are changing.

Steve Harvey has a great book that tackles this idea called Act Like A Success, Think Like A Success. In it he talks about how to take your gift, the thing that you do naturally that no one else can with the greatness that you do, and use it to make your dreams come true. Harvey calls this your vehicle. Your gift needs a vehicle to take it to the next level, but you won’t always stay in the same vehicle to get to your end result.

Vehicles change. Dreams are the destination.

Here’s a little insight into my story and how my vehicles have changed a few times in the last few years, which was a little scary to me because they’d stayed the same for over a decade. I should have been cautious about the fact that I’d stayed at the same place doing a lot of the same things for so long. Instead, I was proud of the fact that most of my young adult friends were working on their 3rd or 4th job before turning 30 and I was still doing the same work I’d started when I was a teenager.

There is something to be said for commitment and longevity. But you have to look at the lifeblood too. I wasn’t stagnant in my job, but it also wasn’t fulfilling me in the ways that I wanted (and needed) to be fulfilled. Actually, I’d reached the ceiling on how far in the organization I was going to be allowed to go by age 29. And I knew it. But I didn’t do anything to try and improve my situation until faced with some startling realities and that forced me to move.

The fact that I had peaked in terms of how far I could grow in a company before turning 30 should have been alarming (in the ways described earlier) in my pursuit forward and should have led to a shifting in what my goals were. However, since I didn’t have clarity on my dreams, I couldn’t see that there was something really wrong with where I was and what I was investing my energies in.

I wanted to be a big success in the radio industry, but I didn’t want to be in the Pop-Radio space (think Top 40, Taylor Swift, Katie Perry, etc). I also didn’t want to move to a bigger city. So, in essence, I’d pigeon-holed my growth to have to be only where I already was. The dream itself needed to shift and the vehicle to get me to the real dream needed to change.

I worked at a public radio station that operated on a university campus with an all-student on-air staff, but a professional staff of 5 people who maintained the station’s revenues, operations, administration, marketing, and community connection. My role as Operations Director involved every aspect of the station some form or fashion (a bit in the fundraising and administration but not as much as the operations and community connection).

It was a leadership role that gave me a ton of experience in community building, organizational leadership, effective communication, teaching, networking, and management. But as I got into my 30s things around me started to change, meaning co-workers changed jobs and other factors, but I didn’t shift my outlook on the future. I didn’t have a direction.

What I enjoyed most was working one-on-one with college students as a mentor and leader. Teaching someone to talk on the radio takes time and patience. Teaching students how to ask questions that lead to other questions that lead to deeper questions when interviewing someone for a news story is what creates powerful radio. I really enjoyed that. Outside of the teaching of radio operations, I had a direct line into a many young people’s lives and had the opportunity to lead them in ways that went beyond working in the radio or journalism industry. I got to coach them on life stuff, like how to balance their budgets, what to look for in a job and career atmosphere, leadership development, and more. That was the best part of the work that I did, and the one thing I miss most from not being there.

I didn’t see it at the time but I do now. My dream wasn’t to work in radio, or be a big deal in the industry. The dream really was to work with individual people and lead them to bigger and greater things. Radio was the vehicle for that. The same is true for The Appetizer Radio Show. I created the show to be able to hear really great music on the radio instead of the same, boring 15 songs by the same boring 10 artists every day.

The music and media culture has shifted much since 2003 where now you can listen to the most obscure musicians online and on FM from a variety of channels. The dream for The Appetizer really wasn’t about doing something new or different. It was about making a difference in people’s lives and taking them to the next step in their journey, especially for the DIY/unsigned/indie musician. Everyone needs a platform that will give their work a start. The Appetizer Radio Show has been that platform for many artists who have gone on to bigger and greater successes.

It’s important to not confuse your vehicle with your dream, but it’s very easy to mistake one for the other. The key is looking deep within yourself and finding that gift that you have. The gift is the one thing you do naturally without bringing in education or training. It isn’t something someone taught you. It is something you were born with. What is it that people around you say you do naturally that is better than anyone else? That’s your gift.

If you don’t know what your gift is, ask some of your closest friends what they think. Then compare notes. I know that I’m naturally an Empoweror (made up word for “one who empowers”). My communications with people, whether online or in person, are done naturally and intentionally to lead to a positive result, even when I’m upset or holding someone accountable. Yet empowering and encouragement aren’t my gifts. They are a part of the gift, but not the whole enchilada.

My gift is that I’m a great listener who thinks objectively and puts pieces together to create a strong perspective and clarity. I can hear the stories people tell me and naturally connect the dots to what is really going on without knowing all the specifics. I’m good at reading people’s mail, as the saying goes. My natural inclination is to take that discernment and communicate in an edifying way that brings encouragement to the person I’m speaking with.  Positive results and outcomes are the results produced. This gift moves people forward, gives them clarity and direction, and takes them to new successes.

I see now how my gift has been used in the past careers I’ve had, yet none of the jobs or careers were the dream. The dream is bigger. What I think is my dream now is probably bigger in reality than what I imagine it is at this point. As I grow and increase the spread of who I am and become more recognizable, the dream will grow too, and the vehicles that take me there will change.

The same is true for you. The vehicle you’re in now to take you to your dream will morph, switch, change, or mutate. Some vehicles you’ll still interact with or catch a ride with periodically as you grow. Others you’ll never see again. The vehicle is what changes, but not the dream itself. The key it to really understand and have confidence in what the heart of your dream is so that you don’t confuse yourself and your direction like I did.

Do you know what your gift is? Can you recognize where you are right now as being a transport to get you closer to fulfilling your dream? How has your dream and your vehicle shifted or grown in the past year? These are the questions to reflect on to see how you’re progressing.

Since you know my gift, let me utilize to benefit you. Reach out to me and tell me your dream and the transport (vehicle) you’re in right now to get to your end goal. Leave a comment or Contact Me and let’s talk.

[feature image by Jeronimo Sanz]

A Mentor Is Many Great Things

Telemachus_and_Mentor1I asked a group of individuals and  professionals what they think of when they think of a MENTOR. This was their response. None of it is negative. All statements are measures of greatness.

Guidance

Present

Humble

Helper

Support

Liberator

pigeonpoint

Guide

Teacher

Wisdom

Non-Judgemental

Knowledgeable

Compassionate

Sharing

Age-less

Experienced In Overcoming Particular Challenges/Obstacles

A mentor is a great resource on your journey. No matter where you are starting from, or how long you’ve been traveling on your course, having a teacher to guide you along your path will save you time, energy, and necessary resources.

Do you have a mentor who is guiding you through your journey to overcome the challenges and obstacles on your path?