Tag Archives: insecurities

Creative PR Tools For Growth With Angela Mastrogiacomo

Angela Mastrogiacomo

The latest episode of the DIY Artist Route Podcast is here! And it features none other than my good friend Angela Mastrogiacomo.

Aside from being one of the most inspiring and kick-ass people I know, Angela excels at the real heart of PR and marketing work: relationship building. That’s why I had to have her on the podcast to share her insights with you.

As a music curator and media host, there are a lot of marketing and PR people who contact me every day, usually for the same reasons. They have an artist or band they want to promote. Maybe there’s a new single their artist just released and they want media feature on my radio show. They want a review or feature of some kind.

This are some of the traditional ways that music promoters, publicists, and PR companies operate. Tragically though, many marketing and PR endeavors fail. Whether it’s a company that charges and arm & a leg for their work or it’s a do-it-from-scratch solo artist reaching out to media for feature, the key element in this puzzle is…….you guessed it, relationship building.

Which has become somewhat of a buzzword these days. When subjects as important as relationship building become buzzwords, it’s easy to lose the meaning of the concept. Which is another big subject we dive into in this podcast.

One big thing that trips creative entrepreneurs like you and I up is our own negative mindsets. Wait, what does that have to do with marketing, or with relationship building? Everything my friend!

Our ego can be our worst enemy. For some artists, the ego says that who they can’t connect with a music influencer with their story or music. So they try to parrot the work that other bigger artists do to promote themselves. It’s not genuine, therefore it doesn’t connect in the best ways that a sincere approach to relationship does.

Other artists struggle with a more arrogant form of ego, one that tells them they should be treated like royalty. So talk yourself up like you’re a god, and have the media eating out of your hand. And if they don’t respond to you this way, screw ’em!

That’s the ego talking.

When you work on marketing yourself, building genuine one-to-one relationships takes you further than anything. It’s what’s made Angela so successful with her work on Muddy Paw PR and Infectious Magazine. She’s written tons of articles for Sonicbids and other music-centered publications, all covering the subjects of marketing, PR, and relationship building.

We all deal with ego. Ego affects our mindsets, creates fears and insecurities, and if not dealt with can cause struggles that aren’t overcome. One weapon against the work of the ego is vulnerability. Sounds strange right? How can vulnerability be the antidote to ego? Angela and I discuss this at length in the podcast.

I’m being fairly overt here. Listen to the podcast. Download it. Share it. Then connect with both of us and share your story with us.

Here are some ways to connect with Angela. She wants to hear from you so reach out to her and tell her you heard her on the DIY Artist Route.

Muddy Paw PR

Infectious Magazine

Facebook

Twitter

She gave her email at the end of the podcast, but in case you missed it you can contact her via angela@muddypawpr.com

Fears and mindsets are struggles for everyone. Honestly, dealing with personal fears and negative mindsets has been a very big part of my year in 2017, which is why you haven’t seen me post as many blogs or pieces.

I’ve learned a lot in this process, and understand more how to face deep fears, and what it takes to overcome them to win in business and in life. If this is a struggle for you, you’re not alone.

And if you want someone in your corner to talk through things, and learn how to overcome them, connect with me. My email is dgrant@dgrantsmith.com. Mention this blog post in your message. Let’s get you to the growth and success you want together!

How Having Your Back Leads You Forward

My high school graduation pic. People thought I was 16 until about 4 years ago (I'm in my 30s now)

My high school graduation pic. People thought I was 16 until about 4 years ago (I’m in my 30s now)

Let me shoot you straight-when it comes to height and weight I’m a little dude. I might be taller than Bruno Mars or Prince (who is apparently 5’2″) but body size and weight are actually big deals to guys as much as girls.

This can lead to confidence issues in those beloved teenage years where all of your friends, who are also going through changes in their height, weight, and other body factors, are always the most encouraging people on earth. Wait, our peers are always the most encouraging people, right?

Of course I’m being facetious there. In high school I was a little over 5 feet tall and maybe weighed 100 lbs. That is a scrawny little dude. But that was me. And some other physical attributes helped me to be the brunt of a lot of jokes and a bit of bullying in school. I hated it, as most kids do. I also didn’t know really what to do about it, so I used sarcasm as a means of deflecting pointed remarks. And I hid/avoided the 2 people I knew would give me the most hell.

What made the difference for me in that era of time wasn’t a self-help book or taking a kung-fu class. Though I really did want to take kung-fu. Bruce Lee was only 5’4″ in his day and he kicked everyone’s ass. That gave me some hope. But it wasn’t the path for me. Instead, I found some love in an unexpected place that changed everything.

As you know, I’m a radio guy and have been since the late 1990s. How and where I got my start plays a role in this story of overcoming bullying because often our work or ambition experiences play larger roles in the things that we are and who we become. While in 10th grade I was given the opportunity to work on-air at a community college radio station about 30 miles from my hometown.

The station (89.7 KACC) was in Alvin, Tx. I lived in Sugar Land. One or two times a week I would drive down to Alvin and do my radio shift. It was a ton of fun and some of the best work experience I could have ever had. That experience on-air and doing radio stuff is what opened the door for me to start my freshman year of college working on-air in Abilene (ironically on 89.7 KACU).

The professional ground isn’t the focus of my story this time, but that gives context to where I’m going. There were two main guys who took me under their wing at KACC, Eddie and Shannon. Two room-mates who made me one of their buddies. I got to hang out with them off the air, camp out on weekends and essentially be a college guy 2 years before I should have.

In school I spent a lot of time feeling intimidated and picked on, though there was only one or two people who went to great lengths to do that to me and to others. Those instances of bullying, being picked on, belittled, and chastised still had terrible consequences on my self-esteem. Being embarrassed and bullied by someone who is physically bigger and stronger doesn’t do much to make you want to show up in class. There’s a reason why most TV shows and movies that involve high school portray bullies as jocks and athletes. The aggression they have has to be channeled, but realistically they feel as fearful as anyone else. Yet their pride makes them take that fear out on others. What do fearful people with physical power do? They prey on the smaller, physically weaker people. History tells us this repeatedly.

Hanging out with big Hispanic dudes who are 22 or 23 years old while you’re a short, skinny 16 year old white kid is empowering. It was to me. And they loved me, for whatever reason. One day while we were hanging out, one of my college friends, Shannon, could tell something was on my mind. It had been a rough week and I’d been austricized at school. Shannon asked what was wrong and I said a dude was messing with me, and he was much bigger than I so what could I do about it.

“Where does he live?” Shannon asked with a straight face. I knew what his thought process was. These weren’t guys who looked for fights, but they weren’t ones who ran from them either. And they were stout enough to hold their own and then some. Shannon was also a black belt in Tae Kwan Do.

“Don’t worry about it man,” I said. “I do appreciate it though.”

“No seriously, where does he live? I used to be a little guy like you and I got picked on a lot. It sucked. I remember what it feels like to be bullied. I will gladly show this punk what it feels like for a bigger, stronger person to put him in his place,” Shannon replied.

And that changed everything.

What followed wasn’t a scene out of a revenge film where we loaded up in a car, all 4 of us and drove the 30 miles back to my hometown, knocked on a door and then made mince-meat out of a teenage bully. What changed was my attitude and confidence.

Why didn’t I give the address to Eddie and Shannon to go take care of my bullying issue? Because even then I knew it would only make things worse, especially for them as young adults. The bully folks weren’t the kids of people who wouldn’t do anything about the 20-somethings who beat up their son. There were political and social elements that would make this situation much worse. So I thanked my friends for their love and said if it ever got to a place where I couldn’t handle it, I’d call them. Fortunately it never did.

Here’s what changed that made the difference.

When someone you trust and respect tells you that they have your back, will go out of their way to tackle a problem you have so that you don’t have to worry about it anymore, you should feel empowered.

IMG_1333My confidence took a steroid shot that day, and I didn’t even know it. Looking back now it all seems so clear. I didn’t cower or hide from people (or at least the same people I’d hidden from for the past few years when this happened). There was no reason to hide. If things got bad, I had a number to call who would come to my aid. That kind of support isn’t common, but it’s highly empowering.

Knowing we’re loved gives us confidence.

When you’re a kid, and sometimes even in adulthood, when we think of love we think romance or family bonds. Love isn’t just those things. Love is valuing someone else and doing whatever is necessary to make sure they are safe and taken care of. Love is looking at someone else’s best interest and putting them before you, even if it costs you something.

“I’ve got your back” is love in its purest sense. Nothing asked in return, no favors required to be put into effect. It’s just straight “You matter to me and I won’t let anyone or anything hurt you.”

As a followup to some of the life experiences described earlier, I’ve moved on and done a good bit of forgiveness, most of which the individuals involved know nothing about. That’s the thing about forgiveness, it’s really more about you than the people who caused you pain. Holding on to past pain and grudges only stymies your growth and ability to move forward. It also keeps those same fears in place, instead of releasing them to have the freedom you want.

Every single one of us struggles with fear in some form or fashion. For me it was fears regarding self-image and body size stuff. With friends who had my back, I was able to overcome a lot of these issues at that crossroad in time and move on to pursuing my dreams. I later returned to facing those fears head on in my 20s, which I talk about and describe in this blog post.

Do you struggle with fears and want to know that someone has your back? Let’s talk about what fears are keeping you from pursuing the goals and dreams that you have. Reach out to me below and let’s tackle them together. I have your back.